The Boris Bike // London’s Bike Hire Scheme in Action

5 Aug
7300M Investment in Bombs

20M Investment in Bikes, 7300M Investment in Bombs

As a continuation of the entry on the Bike Hire Scheme pre-debut, we’re including some more commentary we find and how people have reacted to the Boris Bike post-debut.  This will be updated whenever we find something relevant to the Boris Bike and, at times, transport strategies for London.

 

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3 Responses to “The Boris Bike // London’s Bike Hire Scheme in Action”

  1. Richard Tulloch September 19, 2010 at 10:37 pm #

    What are the UK helmet laws and do they affect the use of Boris bikes? Debate here in Australia still rages, with steam coming out of a lot of ears.

    http://richardtulloch.wordpress.com/2010/09/15/bike-helmets-an-on-again-off-again-argument/

    • 56abikespace October 3, 2010 at 6:28 pm #

      Hmm interesting…and probably warrants its own blog post sometime here in the future! In the UK helmets are not mandatory and do not affect the use of Boris bikes (I’ve seen loads of people on Boris bikes without helmets, for example). Also, the majority of cycle deaths here in London the past few years have been from HGVs (Heavy Goods Vehicles), and helmets have done little in terms of protection in those situations. On the other hand, helmets do protect people(‘s heads) who have been in cycle accidents with smaller cars and ultimately save lives. I’m trying to remain unbiased here because I’ve heard loads of arguments from both sides of the fence!

      If you want some resources in terms of helmet laws and the UK, I’ve come across these:
      PRO HELMET
      – In December 2007, the British government agency Cycling England published Cycling and Health: What’s the Evidence?, considered the most comprehensive guide ever written regarding the health benefits of cycling.

      ANTI HELMET
      Nohelmetlaw.org.uk

      An article on helmets, the Boris Bike, and Australia
      Cyclists’ Defense Fund
      London Cycling Campaign
      Compiled data and reports on helmet law and safety in England

  2. Richard Tulloch October 3, 2010 at 8:34 pm #

    Thanks for all that. I’ll check out the those reports. From a public health point of view, it seems simple enough to me – make helmets optional, but strongly encourage their use through education and advertising, at least until infrastructure becomes safer and numbers of cyclists increase (as they are rapidly doing here in Australia).

    From a political point of view, it’s harder. Say you’re a state premier whose government abolishes our current mandatory helmet law. Someone without a helmet is bound to be killed or injured within the month and your name will be splattered all over the media. Much safer for you politically to do nothing.

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